Bank It or Plank It 2019

Posted by Alayna Osborne @alaynaosborne, Sep 12, 2019

Please click here to take the Bank It or Plank It survey.

We apologize for including the wrong link in the email. If you’re looking for more tips and tricks from participants, please read below.

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Year after year, financial concerns are one of the leading causes of stress in America. It’s time to break the trend and discover your very own lost treasure.

During this 5-week challenge, you will be the captain of your own ship. Your efforts earn their weight in gold! Fill up your treasure chest by collecting as many gold coins as possible. Challenge yourself further by completing extra bonus activities! Explore the resources to increase your financial knowledge and discover easy ways to reduce spending, save more, pay off debt, and sail to financial well-being.

Before you know it, the “lost” treasure will be yours!

@keepingactive

My parent saved all of there change and growing up they purchased 2 snowmobiles and carpet for the house. So when I was young I started saving all of my change and when I was 27 paid $4,000 cash from my change for my first Harley

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That's awesome! I knew someone who put money in a jar every time cigarettes would have been purchased, and took child on vacation. Win Win!

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@ahmedz

I need to build my credit rating here in the states – I will be applying for a credit card, use it for daily expenses and pay in full each month. Are there any other products I need to build my credit score? Thanks!

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Hi @ahmedz – a credit card can have a useful place in a consumer’s financial toolbox! It sounds like you are in a “credit building” phase of your life. If that’s the case, I think you’re on the right track: paying off the balance in full and on-time will help build your score. One more piece of advice: I recommend using no more than 25% of the credit limit.
If your credit limit isn’t very high, consider using that credit card to pay one small bill each month (such as a streaming service that you already pay for) and then setting up an automatic payment to pay off the balance of your credit card in full every month.

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@tk618

Hi @ahmedz – a credit card can have a useful place in a consumer’s financial toolbox! It sounds like you are in a “credit building” phase of your life. If that’s the case, I think you’re on the right track: paying off the balance in full and on-time will help build your score. One more piece of advice: I recommend using no more than 25% of the credit limit.
If your credit limit isn’t very high, consider using that credit card to pay one small bill each month (such as a streaming service that you already pay for) and then setting up an automatic payment to pay off the balance of your credit card in full every month.

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what is the reasoning behind only using no more than 25% of credit limit?

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@tinabialzik

When I was thinking about ways our family saves money, three things came to mind right away.
1. I have a lot of landscaping and use a lot of mulch. I purchase mulch from a local tree trimmer. He delivers a HUGE truck load for $40. It saves me money and a lot of time.
2. There are a number of stores that price match. When shopping at Scheel's, I always look up the price online, and the clerks are always happy to match any lower prices I find. I get great customer service, shop local, and save money.
3. Date night no longer has to be a Saturday night. If we go out to dinner, we take advantage of local deals during the week and save a bundle.

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Tina, I got this email form PerkSpot on 09/24. It had some restaurant deal with a value of $100 only for $30. You might want to check it out.

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@tk618

Hi @ahmedz – a credit card can have a useful place in a consumer’s financial toolbox! It sounds like you are in a “credit building” phase of your life. If that’s the case, I think you’re on the right track: paying off the balance in full and on-time will help build your score. One more piece of advice: I recommend using no more than 25% of the credit limit.
If your credit limit isn’t very high, consider using that credit card to pay one small bill each month (such as a streaming service that you already pay for) and then setting up an automatic payment to pay off the balance of your credit card in full every month.

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Tai, this is very helpful. Yes, I need to establish credit here in the states as I've been here about 3 months now. Thank you for the advice and I'll take note of the 25% limit, had no clue about this.

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Bank with Banks that are not Publicly Traded. In my experience they do not have the best interest for their customers. I have found the best banks are the smaller ones like Credit Unions who value you as a customer and don't think your expendable over a shareholder. Shop around on interest rates and hidden charges and you will often find those smaller banks will not stick it to you.

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@kelly62

what is the reasoning behind only using no more than 25% of credit limit?

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Hi @kelly62 – Credit Utilization is the ratio of how much credit is used in comparison with how much is available. It is one of the factors used in creating a credit score. This is why a "maxed out" credit card can take a big bite out of a consumer's credit score. Leaving space on a credit card between what is owed (balance) and what could be owed (the credit limit) will help a consumer's credit score.

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@ahmedz

I need to build my credit rating here in the states – I will be applying for a credit card, use it for daily expenses and pay in full each month. Are there any other products I need to build my credit score? Thanks!

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Hello, I found this article from Experian (one of the major credit handlers or a "multinational consumer credit reporting company") that can help you learn to build your credit here: https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/credit-education/improving-credit/building-credit/.
Best wishes,
Andrea

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I have found that saving money is easiest for me when I set it up for automatic withdrawal or by ACH deposits from my work paychecks. I don't realize that I "have the money" because my savings is in a different institution than where my checking. In turn, I spend less because I feel like I have less. I can also be more focused on what loans I can pay more principal off (mortgage, student loans, car) or what I can prepay for next month's bills if in case I have a large purchase/spending spree to go on (yearly auto insurance plan payment, holidays, birthdays, travel plans, etc.). For example, I have all my bills for November and half of them for December paid as of this last paycheck so I can now use my money for my holiday travel plans and gifts!

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@tk618

Hi @kelly62 – Credit Utilization is the ratio of how much credit is used in comparison with how much is available. It is one of the factors used in creating a credit score. This is why a "maxed out" credit card can take a big bite out of a consumer's credit score. Leaving space on a credit card between what is owed (balance) and what could be owed (the credit limit) will help a consumer's credit score.

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good to know, thanks!

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@andreak

Hello, I found this article from Experian (one of the major credit handlers or a "multinational consumer credit reporting company") that can help you learn to build your credit here: https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/credit-education/improving-credit/building-credit/.
Best wishes,
Andrea

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Hi Andrea, thank you very much, this is extremely helpful. So many ways to explore. I hope something works out for me. Happy Friday! Best, Zubair

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@timmahle

Bank with Banks that are not Publicly Traded. In my experience they do not have the best interest for their customers. I have found the best banks are the smaller ones like Credit Unions who value you as a customer and don't think your expendable over a shareholder. Shop around on interest rates and hidden charges and you will often find those smaller banks will not stick it to you.

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Thanks for this, I totally agree with you.

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