Measuring Performance

Apr 23, 2019 | Barb Rechtzigel | @BRechtzigel | Comments (2)

MeasurementWrapping up Patrick Lenicioni’s findings, the factors that can inhibit an employee’s happiness and sense of engagement is the third element of Immeasurement. This is a word that Lenicioni crafted to describe an employee’s lack of ability to assess their progress or success on the job. This can cause a sense of ambiguity and employees can feel disengaged in the workplace. Establishing effective measures for the work that people do can help give a sense of purpose and drive to the work we do.

The key is to make sure the measurements are relevant and reasonable. If the measurement does not fit the work or is tied to outcomes over which an employee has no control, this can lead to a new sense of frustration. Also, these measurements need not be completely quantitative. Even an informal survey of the work being performed, or verbally observing that an employee is hitting the mark in terms of the contribution they are making to the team gives them the sense they are doing what is not only expected of them, but is also highly valued by the team.

Giving employees measurable guidelines helps to promote a sense of accomplishment. They can check the box that says they got the job done well. That is satisfying for all of us and keeps us coming back for more.

Find these tips and so much more in Patrick Lenicioni's book The Truth about Employee Engagement.

Measuring Performance

REPLY

Excellent points. Agree qualitative input and feedback can be of great value and provide more clarity and insight to facilitate growth and improvement.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.