What are you reading?

Posted by Treasure Ransom @transom, Mar 16, 2017

I am a big reader and am always looking for book recommendations! @sportsmom and @amdow have both mentioned they are readers. Who else likes to read and what are you reading right now?

I am listening to an audiobook called “The Sender”. It is a great book about a football coach that is struggling with a cancer diagnosis and very aggressive chemotherapy. He receives anonymous letters that test him and strengthen him during his difficult journey. The letters were actually written and sent to an NFL coach going through a similar situation, but the story around the character in “The Sender” is fictional. Touching story. I am probably 1/3 of the way through and am enjoying it so far.

Feel free to share what you are reading and why you would or wouldn’t recommend it. All genres are fair game! 🙂

@bobbydavis

I’m reading “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking”

We live in a culture where the loudest person in the room is often assumed to be the person with the most knowledge/expertise. In other words, the extroverts.. the Type A’s and so on. As a result, they’re often the ones who are put into (or take) leadership positions or roles… whether they’re best-suited or not.

The author refers to this as the “culture of personality.” But how did it get this way? Why?

The book is a fascinating history of how we transitioned from a “culture of character” to a “culture of personality.” It’s good stuff. Of course, I’m an introvert so it’s naturally of interest to me, but I’d be really curious to hear an extrovert’s opinion on the book.

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I also enjoyed that book!

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I really enjoy the “Killing” series by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. I am now reading “Killing England” & it is excellent. I would say that “Killing The Rising Sun” was my favorite. These books give you a different historical perspective and new facts about events that actually happened.

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@kaylieguderian

I read a Man Called Ove a couple months ago and cannot recommend it enough! I also just finished the Late Homecomer which was riveting and I finished in a day.

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Agreed! I couldn’t recommend A Man Called Ove enough since I just finished it. I had a little trouble getting into it. My thought was “I cannot keep reading about this grumpy old man”! But Ove worked his way into my life and heart and I want EVERYONE to read it now!

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I recently ready Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance and enjoyed it very much! Here is one description of it from online I could not say it better!

“From a former Marine and Yale Law School Graduate, a poignant account of growing up in a poor Appalachian town, that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. Part memoir, part historical and social analysis, J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy is a fascinating consideration of class, culture, and the American dream.”

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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I loved the “The Life We Bury”!

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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I just got The Deep Dark Descending by the same author as The Life We Bury, Allen Askens. Can’t wait to read it!

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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What’s this book about Shanda – sounds really interesting!

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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@mtp06, are you asking about The Life We Bury? If so, here is the description. I have it on audiobook if you are interested in listening to it.

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe’s life is ever the same.

Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran–and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

As Joe writes about Carl’s life, especially Carl’s valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory.

Thread by thread, Joe unravels the tapestry of Carl’s conviction. But as he and Lila dig deeper into the circumstances of the crime, the stakes grow higher. Will Joe discover the truth before it’s too late to escape the fallout?

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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I would love to listen to this book if you’re willing to loan it out.

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I just finished “My Last Step Backward,” an autobiography of a young woman, Tasha Schuh, who suffered a spinal cord injury, never to walk again. I believe anyone can learn from her life story and put the simple struggles we might have into perspective of what she has gone through.

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@creeve

I recently read “The Underground Railroad” by Colton Whitehead; it was a bit of a slow start for me but I got into it by the end. I also read “The Mothers” by Brit Bennett, and “Good as Gone” by Amy Gentry. A bit of a mix of books so always open to others recommendations! Good as Gone was a page-turner for me, I think I read it in one evening on the weekend (bit of a thriller). When I get hooked into a story line, it’s often hard for me to put it down but I’ve found that love of reading is now transferring to my young kids – so I’ll call it a win! 🙂

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Absolutely, @bjs03! I will stick it my bag and we can make arrangements for pickup.

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Christine Comaford (Author of Smart Tribes: How Teams Become Brilliant Together) has come out with a new book “Power Your Tribe: Create Resilient Teams in Turbulent Times”.

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