Bank It or Plank It: Financial Bingo

Posted by Marianne Goettig @marianneg316, Oct 4, 2018

FIND YOUR LOST TREASURE: OCTOBER 15 – NOVEMBER 18, 2018

Year after year, financial concerns are one of the leading causes of stress in America. It’s time to break the trend and discover your very own lost treasure.

During this 5-week challenge, you will be the captain of your own ship. Before you raise anchor and set sail, start your adventure by defining an achievable goal. Set your course for success by getting bingo as many times as possible.

Challenge yourself further and swab the deck by getting a blackout bingo card by the end of the adventure! Explore the resources to increase your financial knowledge and discover small ways to reduce spending, save more, pay off debt and sail closer to financial security.

Before you know it, the “lost” treasure will be yours! Register Today! http://newsletter.carehubs.com/h/j/D69C1EE8BC958B6A

@jammin

My goal is to set aside money from each paycheck along with the sales from resale shop items for a trip to Alaska with my siblings.

I stock my desk with healthy snacks and bring lunch to work every day to save money. I love left-overs for lunch and my husband won't eat them.

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What a great idea to save the profits from the resale shop!

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@tinabialzik

Jokes of the Sea
Q: What is a pirate’s favorite kind of cookie?
A: Ship's Ahoy!

Share with us your favorite bring-lunch-from-home hacks and your SMART goal for Bank It or Plank It Financial Bingo.

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I have large containers that I stock every Sunday evening – 3 for veggies, 1 for meatless protein such as mung beans, lentils, etc., and 1 for other protein such as chicken or fish. It makes packing a lunch easy. Pick 2 veggies and 1 protein, add sesame oil, sriracha sauce or other seasoning and ….Voila! Lunch is made.
My goal for the challenge is to get rid of the clutter and minimize. If I haven't used it in a year, it's time to sell it or donate it. There is someone who has a need for what I don't.

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I have never heard of Mung Beans, just googled it and will be adding to my lunch menu, thanks for the tip!

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Do you have a recipe I could use for the Mung beans?

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@keepingactive

Do you have a recipe I could use for the Mung beans?

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They are a powerhouse of nutrients and antioxidants. I cook them as directed on the package. I prefer to buy them sprouted or split but whole mung beans are just as easy to make. Add them to boiling water and cook for 20 minutes. I like mine a bit crunchy so I reduce the cook time. I add them to broccoli, chopped tomato, mushrooms and roasted walnuts for a simple salad. Use half mung bean and half split peas when making pea soup. They are great to add to soups and stews. I love the nutty flavor and prefer them as a side dish to my veggies adorned with chopped avocado, cayenne pepper and fresh lemon juice.

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We've been debt free for over a year, so no more mortgage or car payments to others. Since we had budgeted for these expenses, we continued making payments, but to ourselves by putting those 'payments' into a subaccount at the credit union.
We are really close to the $$ goal we had set to save for our kitchen remodel!

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Jokes of the Sea
Q: Why don’t pirates shower before they walk the plank?
A: Because they’ll just wash up on shore later.

There are many free apps that offer coupons, discounts, or store rewards. What are your favorite apps and why?

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When I have to shop at Target, I use Cartwheel. I just tried the drive up option this weekend and not only did it save me time, but there was zero risk of items that weren't on my shopping list sneaking their way into my cart. 🙂

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@tk618

Jokes of the Sea
Q: Why don’t pirates shower before they walk the plank?
A: Because they’ll just wash up on shore later.

There are many free apps that offer coupons, discounts, or store rewards. What are your favorite apps and why?

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I shop a lot at Once Upon a Child to purchase almost all of my children's clothes and they have a rewards app called Fivestars. I save 50% or more off retail by buying gently used clothes/shoes/Halloween costumes and earn rewards that save me even more money on clothes!

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@marvel85

I have large containers that I stock every Sunday evening – 3 for veggies, 1 for meatless protein such as mung beans, lentils, etc., and 1 for other protein such as chicken or fish. It makes packing a lunch easy. Pick 2 veggies and 1 protein, add sesame oil, sriracha sauce or other seasoning and ….Voila! Lunch is made.
My goal for the challenge is to get rid of the clutter and minimize. If I haven't used it in a year, it's time to sell it or donate it. There is someone who has a need for what I don't.

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Great idea, gives a little variety for lunches too! I'm using this system!

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@tk618

When I have to shop at Target, I use Cartwheel. I just tried the drive up option this weekend and not only did it save me time, but there was zero risk of items that weren't on my shopping list sneaking their way into my cart. 🙂

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I love using Cartwheel, I have just shy of $200 saved using it. One of the employees at Target showed me that you can scan items and it will automatically update your Cartwheel (rather than having to scroll through the offers and finding them). Scanning on demand saves time and guarantees you aren't missing out on a savings opportunity!

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A couple years ago, my two kids ate school lunch most days. It was convenient. I admit it. When they stopped, we knew we were saving money, but I never calculated the actual cost until this morning. For two lunches and two milks every day, it's $8.00. That's $40.00 a week. Over the course of the 180-day school year, that is equivalent to $1440.00! Over 12 years of school, that's $17,280 assuming prices remain the same.

When we made the transition to home lunches, my husband and I made their lunches, but that soon changed. The kids weren't eating everything we packed and so much was going to waste. They now prefer to make their own lunch and appreciate the effort it takes. Plus, they choose what they eat each day. (That part still requires some parental oversight from time to time.) As a result of the change, we contribute more to their 529 plans, the kids eat healthier meals and learn valuable lessons about meal planning and finances, and they like home lunches more.

It was a small change that is making a huge difference.

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